un article qui provient du zine Mysterycal

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas

un article qui provient du zine Mysterycal

Message  hellrick le Jeu 6 Déc 2007 - 13:14

THE NIGHT OF THE WOLF

by Nicholas Fuller



This short story collection (Wildfire, 2006) is the first translation of any of French detective writer Paul Halter's books into English. (Courtesy of Robert Adey and John Pugmire, whose excellent article on Halter can be found here: http://www.mysteryfile.com/Halter/Locked_Rooms.html .) More translations are promised, so hopefully it won't be long before Anglophone readers can enjoy his best books: Le Diable de Dartmoor , in which an invisible man seduces and murders village girls; L'Image trouble , with its double narrative alternating between past and present; and his masterpiece, La Septième hypothèse , his masterpiece, about a murderous duel between an actor and a playwright.

Halter is a very uneven writer, and for every one of his novels that I admire and enjoy, there is one that I loathe. A short story collection like this, which showcases both his strengths and his weaknesses, is therefore the perfect introduction to his work.

Although he has often been proclaimed as the heir to John Dickson Carr, his impossible crimes are often disappointing. He has a brilliant knack for thinking up situations – a keeper burnt to death in an inaccessible lighthouse in the middle of a storm, a maharajah assassinated in his palace behind three locked doors – but the solutions are often disappointing. They lack the sheer simplicity of Carr or Chesterton, and, like Talbot and Rawson's books, often feel like elaborate but ultimately banal tricks (fiddling with locks and bits of string – neither exciting nor particularly fair). A 139 pas de la mort , for instance, has a memorable locked room – years-old corpse unearthed and installed in his favourite armchair, without the perpetrator leaving a single footprint in the layers of dust that cover the floor – but the method is disappointing, and the event itself almost entirely irrelevant. Just as disappointing is “The Dead Don't Dance at Night” (in this collection). The situation (coffins flung about a sealed vault) echoes Carr's Burning Court and Sleeping Sphinx , but the solution doesn't live up to it, because it doesn't feel properly integrated. Others rely on chance or on the victims doing the psychologically impossible; consider, for instance, Les Sept miracles du crime , in which one of the victims dies of thirst through sheer willpower, refusing to touch the glass of water in front of him.

In many cases, the murderer is far more memorable than the method. Le Cri de la sirène , for instance, has a pretty mediocre impossible crime (villain dresses up as banshee, appears at window, and so frightens victim so much that he walks backwards off the edge of a tower), but a separate criminal scheme of Chestertonian horror – a cross between “The Perishing of the Pendragons” and Carr's Crooked Hinge .

As a novelist, Halter is very problematic. His characterisation is often mediocre, yet in his later books, he spends more time describing the suspects' romances and quarrels than on the crime and detection, which makes several of them heavy-going. His worldview is very bleak and cynical, but, coupled with inferior characterisation, means that endings which are meant to be dark and powerful often fail dismally. He is very fond of epilogues in which characters innocent of murder are revealed to be guilty of some other crime, and receive their comeuppance; this works well in La Quatrième porte and La Mort derrière les rideaux , but Le Diable de Dartmoor , great though it is, is let down by its nasty epilogue, in which the detective, Dr. Twist, almost arbitrarily decides that a perfectly likeable man needs to be taught a lesson, and humiliates him in front of the village. In this collection, both the title story, with elements of Carr's Burning Court , and “The Golden Ghost”, or Dickens's Christmas Carol gone sour, fall into this category. The latter nearly pulls it off – although, since the miser victim repents, the reader doesn't feel that he deserves his fate, and probably has more sympathy for him than the author intended. The superior counterpart to the tale is “The Match Girl”, about the death of a miser at Christmas, but is much more satisfying, because the solution is artistically right.

SERIOUS SPOILERS: CHRISTIE'S ENDLESS NIGHT , SEVERAL OF HALTER'S NOVELS

Above all, Halter suffers from the malady he diagnoses in one story as “Ripperomania”: an unhealthy obsession with Jack the Ripper and his crimes. This is invariably combined with an equal obsession with Agatha Christie's Endless Night , in which the roguish if likeable protagonist turns out to be a cold-blooded psychopath. This device recurs with depressing frequency in his novels. All but four of his first five novels are variations on it, and, although it recurs more recently, reaches its absolute nadir in the depressing Lettre qui tue .

In fact, Halter sometimes seems to have a grudge against his protagonists. Even when the heroes are not murderers, they are reincarnations of murderers, fall in love with murderesses, or are killed themselves. Take Le Tigre borgne (2004), which I read only last week, and so is fresh in my memory. The murderer's identity is a clever surprise, and, if Halter had ended the book there, it would have been one of his very best. Instead, the murderer, once identified, kills himself and the heroine. The hero, now heartbroken, takes passage from India on a ship that catches fire and sinks. A minor villain then impersonates him and forces a character we've hardly met, and don't care about, to commit suicide. Because we're not involved with the characters, who are little more than stick figures wholly subservient to the plot, this comes across as gratuitous – and, therefore, as bad art .

And yet, for all this, Halter's detective plots are often excellent. He is at his best when writing the pure detective story, with its double-sided clues, multiple solutions, unbreakable alibis and surprise villains. One thinks not only of his best books like La Septième hypothèse, Le Diable du Dartmoor and L'Image trouble , mentioned above, but also of La Quatrième porte, La Mort derrière les rideaux , La Tête du tigre (despite one of his favourite themes), and Le Roi du désordre . This is one of the strengths of the short story. Because of its length, it is almost entirely plot, and so must rely on a strong mystery and a clever solution. Fortunately nearly all of the stories in this collection have both. In the first story, “The Abominable Snowman”, dressed as a soldier, clubs a man to death with a rifle butt, and has an elaborately ingenious plot. “The Call of the Lorelei”, which, like Halter's first novel, La Malèdiction de Barberousse , relies on Alsatian hatred of Germany , has a murder method of almost Chestertonian simplicity. “The Tunnel of Death” seems like Halter's homage to Simenon, with a professional policeman soaking up the atmosphere of an extremely long escalator where a man was shot dead (impossibly, of course). On the other hand, “The Cleaver”, about a premonition of murder, feels pre -Golden-Age, and, with its American Wild West setting, recalls Melville Davisson Post's Uncle Abner or Edward Hoch's Ben Snow. Finally, “Murder in Cognac ” echoes Carr's He Who Whispers , with its impossible murder on top of a French tower, and has an extremely clever twist on an old method.

All in all, a collection which whets the reader's appetite, while showcasing both the considerable strengths (original impossible situations, plotting ingenuity, clueing) and weaknesses (mediocre characterisation, bleak and cynical worldview, occasional lapses into banality) of Paul Halter.

hellrick

Messages : 334
Date d'inscription : 09/11/2007
Age : 43
Localisation : Soignies - Belgique

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://bis.cinemaland.net

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: un article qui provient du zine Mysterycal

Message  Greg le Jeu 6 Déc 2007 - 19:19

Merci pour cette longue transcription! (ou bien pour ce copier/coller?)

Un article très intéressant, certes je ne partage pas totalement l'avis de l'auteur lorqu'il considère Halter inférieur à Carr et Chesterton.
Sur le plan du style, voire de la profondeur,il n'est certes pas au niveau de ce dernier.Mais pour la qualité des énigmes, il soutient largement la comparaison.
Ensuite, les préférences pour tel ou tel roman, c'est très subjectif, comme on l' a vu...

Il y a d'ailleurs un site amerlocain à propos de PH:

http://www.paulhalter.com/index2.html

Greg

Messages : 49
Date d'inscription : 31/10/2007

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: un article qui provient du zine Mysterycal

Message  hélène le Jeu 6 Déc 2007 - 20:05

"Un article très intéressant, certes je ne partage pas totalement l'avis de l'auteur lorqu'il considère Halter inférieur à Carr et Chesterton."

Chauvinisme, pzut-être.
Nicholas Fuller n'est-il pas Nick Fuller, inscrit comme membre de ce forum.
PH est peut-être mieux connu chez les anglos-saxons

hélène
Admin

Messages : 461
Date d'inscription : 31/10/2007

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: un article qui provient du zine Mysterycal

Message  Shok Nar le Mer 19 Déc 2007 - 16:58

Pfiou... Pas le courage de lire...

ça parle de quoi?

de paul halter? lol!
avatar
Shok Nar

Messages : 78
Date d'inscription : 09/10/2007
Age : 36
Localisation : Sarthe

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://shoknar3.unblog.fr

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: un article qui provient du zine Mysterycal

Message  Greg le Jeu 20 Déc 2007 - 11:55

Voici une traduction brillante de monsieur Google :

Ce court recueil (incendies de forêt, 2006) est la première traduction de tout détective de l'écrivain français Paul Halter livres en anglais. (Courtoisie de Robert Adey et John Pugmire, dont l'excellent article sur Halter peuvent être trouvés ici: http://www.mysteryfile.com/Halter/Locked_Rooms.html.) Plus traductions sont promis, alors il faut espérer qu'il ne sera pas avant longtemps Anglophones lecteurs puissent jouir de ses meilleurs livres: Le Diable de Dartmoor, dans laquelle un homme séduit invisibles et les meurtres de filles du village; L'Image du mal, avec sa double récit alternant entre le passé et le présent, et son chef-d'oeuvre, La Septième hypothesis, son chef-d'oeuvre, Au sujet d'un meurtrier duel entre un acteur et un dramaturge.

Halter est un écrivain très inégaux, et pour chacun de ses romans que j'admire et bon, il ya celle que je déteste. Un bref recueil de ce genre, qui présente ses deux points forts et ses faiblesses, est donc la parfaite introduction à son œuvre.

Bien qu'il ait souvent été proclamé comme l'héritier de John Dickson Carr, son impossibilité crimes sont souvent décevants. Il a un brillant talent pour penser vers le haut des situations - un gardien brûlé à mort inaccessible un phare au milieu d'une tempête, d'un maharajah assassiné dans son palais derrière trois portes verrouillées, mais les solutions sont souvent décevants. Ils n'ont pas la pure simplicité de Carr ou Chesterton, et, comme Talbot et Rawson livres, souvent l'impression que les détails, mais en fin de compte banale astuces (jongler avec les serrures et les morceaux de ficelle, ni équitable ni particulièrement excitant). Une 139 pas de la mort ", par exemple, a une salle verrouillée mémorable ans cadavre déterré et installé dans son fauteuil favori, sans l'auteur laisse une empreinte unique dans les couches de poussières qui recouvrent le sol -, mais la méthode est décevante , Et l'événement lui-même presque entièrement dénuée de pertinence. Tout aussi décevant est "The Dead Don't Dance la nuit (dans cette collection). La situation (cercueils jetés sur un scellé voûte) rejoignent Carr's Burning Cour et Sleeping Sphinx, mais la solution ne réside pas à la hauteur, parce qu'il ne se sent pas convenablement intégrées. D'autres se fient à la chance ou sur les victimes fait l'psychologiquement impossible, envisager, par exemple, Les Sept des miracles du crime, dans laquelle l'une des victimes meurt de soif que par la volonté, refusant de toucher le verre d'eau devant lui.

Dans de nombreux cas, le meurtrier est bien plus mémorable que de la méthode. Le Cri de la sirène, par exemple, a une assez médiocre impossible de la criminalité (méchant s'habille comme kookie, apparaît à la fenêtre, et ainsi effraie tant que victime il marche à reculons au large de la pointe d'une tour), mais un autre régime criminel de Chestertonian horreur - un croisement entre "Le Perishing du Pendragons" et Carr's Crooked Hinge.

En tant que romancier, Halter est très problématique. Sa caractérisation est souvent médiocre, mais plus tard, dans son livre, il passe plus de temps à décrire les suspects de romances et de querelles sur la criminalité et la détection, ce qui rend plusieurs d'entre eux lourds en cours. Son monde est très sombre et cynique, mais, associé à la caractérisation inférieure, ce qui signifie que les extensions sont faites pour être sombre et puissant échouent souvent désolante. Il est très attaché à epilogues dans lequel les caractères de l'assassinat d'innocents sont révélés être coupable d'une autre infraction, et de recevoir leurs comeuppance, ce qui fonctionne bien dans La Quatrième Porte et La Mort derrière les rideaux, mais Le Diable de Dartmoor, très bien qu'elle Est, est délaissé par ses mauvaises épilogue, dans lequel la détective, le Dr Twist, presque arbitrairement décide qu'une parfaitement sympa homme doit être enseigné une leçon, et humilie devant lui dans le village. Dans cette collection, à la fois le titre histoire, avec des éléments de Carr's Burning Cour, et "The Golden Ghost", ou de Dickens Christmas Carol allé aigre, entrent dans cette catégorie. Cette dernière tire elle près de l'extérieur, bien que, depuis la avare repent victime, le lecteur n'ait pas l'impression qu'il mérite son sort, et a probablement plus de sympathie pour lui que de l'auteur destiné. Le supérieur hiérarchique homologue du récit "Le Match Girl", sur la mort de l'avare à Noël, mais il est beaucoup plus satisfaisant, car la solution est artistiquement droite.

SERIOUS SPOILERS: CHRISTIE'S ENDLESS NIGHT, DE PLUSIEURS HALTER'S NOVELS

Surtout, Halter souffre de la maladie, il diagnostics dans une histoire comme "Ripperomania": une malsaine obsession de Jack l'éventreur et ses crimes. Celle-ci est toujours combinée avec une obsession de l'égalité des Agatha Christie's Endless Night, dans laquelle le protagoniste bohème si sympa s'avère être un psychopathe sang froid. Ce dispositif se reproduit avec déprimant fréquence dans ses romans. Toutes, sauf quatre de ses cinq premiers romans sont des variations sur celle-ci, et, bien qu'elle se reproduit plus récemment atteint son plus bas absolu dans la Lettre qui mar déprimant.

En fait, parfois Halter semble avoir de la rancune contre ses protagonistes. Même lorsque les héros ne sont pas des assassins, ils sont réincarnation de meurtriers, tomber en amour avec murderesses, ou sont tués eux-mêmes. Prendre Le Tigre borgne (2004), que j'ai lu seulement la semaine dernière, et c'est frais dans ma mémoire. Le meurtrier de l'identité est un astucieux grande surprise, et, si Halter avait pris fin le livre là, il aurait été l'un de ses meilleurs. Au lieu de cela, le meurtrier, une fois identifiés, se tue et de l'héroïne. Le héros, désormais le cœur brisé, prend passage de l'Inde sur un navire qui prend feu et des puits. Un mineur méchant alors usurpe l'identité et les forces lui un personnage que nous avons rencontré à peine, et ne se préoccupent pas, à se suicider. Car nous ne sommes pas impliqués avec les personnages, qui ne sont guère plus que des chiffres bâton totalement inféodée à la parcelle, cette rencontre gratuite, et que, par conséquent, comme une mauvaise technique.

Et pourtant, pour tout cela, le détective Halter parcelles sont souvent excellents. Il est à son meilleur lors de l'écriture de l'histoire détective pur, avec sa double face des indices, des solutions multiples, incassable alibi et surprendre les vilains. On pense non seulement de ses meilleurs livres comme La Septième hypothesis, Le Diable du Dartmoor et de l'Image problèmes, mentionnés ci-dessus, mais aussi de La Quatrième Porte, La Mort derrière les rideaux, La Tête du tigré (en dépit de l'un de ses thèmes favoris ), Et Le Roi du désordre. C'est l'un des points forts de la courte histoire. En raison de sa longueur, il est presque entièrement complot, et ils devront donc compter sur une forte mystère et d'un astucieux de solution. Heureusement presque toutes les histoires de cette collection ont à la fois. Dans la première histoire, "L'abominable homme des neiges", habillés en soldat, les clubs à mort un homme avec une crosse, et dispose d'un complot minutieusement ingénieux. "L'Appel de la Lorelei", qui, comme Halter Le premier roman, La Malèdiction de Barberousse, alsacienne repose sur la haine de l'Allemagne, a une méthode de meurtre presque Chestertonian simplicité. "Le tunnel de la mort", semble Halter l'hommage à Simenon, avec un policier professionnel vous imprégner l'atmosphère d'un très long escalier mécanique où un homme a été tué par balle (impossiblement, bien sûr). D'un autre côté, "Le Cleaver", au sujet d'un pressentiment de meurtre, se sent avant l'âge d'or -, et, avec ses American Wild West paramètre, rappelle Melville Joseph Davisson Post's Uncle Abner ou Edward Hoch Ben Snow. Enfin, "Meurtre à Cognac" échos Carr's He Who Whispers, avec ses impossibles meurtre au sommet d'une tour français, et a une très habile torsion sur une ancienne méthode.

Dans l'ensemble, une collection qui présente une appétit du lecteur, tout en présentant deux atouts considérables (l'original des situations impossibles, comploter ingéniosité, clueing) et les faiblesses (médiocre caractérisation, sombre et cynique du monde, dans les moments d'inattention banalité) de Paul Halter.


Laughing C'est assez clair, non ?

Greg

Messages : 49
Date d'inscription : 31/10/2007

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: un article qui provient du zine Mysterycal

Message  Shok Nar le Jeu 20 Déc 2007 - 13:48

Heu... Sad
aime pas google, moa.. Suspect
avatar
Shok Nar

Messages : 78
Date d'inscription : 09/10/2007
Age : 36
Localisation : Sarthe

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://shoknar3.unblog.fr

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: un article qui provient du zine Mysterycal

Message  hélène le Ven 21 Déc 2007 - 14:31

terrible ! en tout cas pas mieux que lexilogos

hélène
Admin

Messages : 461
Date d'inscription : 31/10/2007

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: un article qui provient du zine Mysterycal

Message  Contenu sponsorisé


Contenu sponsorisé


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut

- Sujets similaires

 
Permission de ce forum:
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum